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Viennese Waltz Videos

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Videos of Viennese Waltz Classes and Dance Instruction:
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Videos of Waltz International Standard Ballroom Syllabus Figures:
BRONZE : beginner |  back whisk |  backward lock |  basic weave |  chasse from pp |  closed changes |  closed impetus |  double reverse spin |  hesitation change |  Natural spin turn |  Natural turn |  Outside change |  Progressive chasse to R |  Reverse corte |  Reverse pivot |  Reverse turn |  whisk |  (sample) |  pictures

SILVER : intermediate |  Closed telemark |  Cross hesitation |  Drag hesitation |  Forward lock |  Open impetus and wing |  Open telemark |  Outside spin |  Turning lock |  Weave from PP |  Wing |  pictures

GOLD : advanced |  Closed wing |  Contra check |  Fallaway natural turn |  Fallaway reverse and slip pivot |  Fallaway whisk |  Hover corte |  Left whisk |  Running spin turn |  Turning lock to R |  pictures

Pictures of Viennese Waltz dancers:
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Viennese Waltz Music   ( 162-168 BPM )

Turn on your computer speakers and you can practice dancing to the following songs !!

#BPMIntroViennese Waltz: Pop Songs      |  Country Songs |  Latin Songs |  Videos |  Main Menu
1.158Caribbean Blue by Enya
2.130Once Upon A December by Deana Carter (Anastasia Soundtrack)
3.133Kiss From A Rose by Seal
4.17817Ten Minutes Ago (Disney Cinderella)
5.147Annie's Song by John Denver
6.157Hijo de la Luna
7.150End of the Road by Boys 2 Men
8.14511Have You Ever Really Loved a Woman by Bryan Adams
9.14924Man of la Mancha by Linda Eder
10.152Carol of the Bells (by many artists)
11.152La Venia Bendita by Marco Antonio Solis
12.143I'll Make Love to You by Boyz 2 Men
13.155Nights in White Satin by the Moody Blues
14.Runaway by the Corrs
15.Blue Danube Waltz 2001
16.Amas Veritas by Alan Silvestri
17.Practical Magic by Alan Silvestri
18.A Thousand Years by Christina Perri
19.Life After You by Daughtry
20.160Elisabeth Serenade by Eva Lind
21.Once Upon a Dream (Instrumental) - Sleeping Beauty
22.Feels like Home by Josh Kelley & Melissa Etheridge
23.I Won't Give Up by Jason Mraz
24.167Oh Holy Night (by many artists)
25.Le Festin by Camille (Ratatouille)
#BPMIntroViennese Waltz: Latin Songs      |  Pop Songs |  Videos |  Main Menu
1.146No Me Toquen Ese Vals by Julio Jaramillo
2.168Tiempo de Vals by Chayanne
3.146Tu Solo Tu by Selena
4.15310Te Sigo Amando by Juan Gabriel
5.152La Venia Bendita by Marco Antonio Solis
#BPMIntroViennese Waltz: Country Songs      |  Pop Songs |  Videos |  Main Menu
1.145Walkin' Away by Clint Black
2.137In Between Dances by Nadine Somers
3.173By My Side by Lorrie Morgan & John Randall
#BPMIntroViennese Waltz: Oldies Songs      |  Pop Songs |  Videos |  Main Menu
1.162Que Sera Sera by Doris Day
2.158That's Amore by Dean Martin
3.158Boom Bang A Bang by Lulu
Slow Waltz Music (84-90 BPM)
Suggest a song for Viennese Waltz!

Waltzing Well

Waltzing Well: Technique      |  Music |  Patterns |  Videos |  Main Menu

A good waltz lead will learn to count the waltz as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 rather than 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3.  This will help the lead to keep track of his patterns as many patterns start on count 1 (when his left foot is free) and many patterns start on count 4 (when his right foot is free).  A good example of this is the progressive left waltz turns which start on count 1, and the progressive right waltz turns which start on count 4.

Good dancers will include the "rise and fall" of the waltz in every pattern throughout the entire dance.  (to count: 1 Low, 2 rise, 3 fall, 4 low, 5 rise, 6 fall).  The "rise and fall" during the waltz should be smooth like the rise and fall of a horse on a carousel.  We can make the waltz much more dramatic by taking much larger steps on counts 1 and 4 and making our other steps smaller.

Progressive waltz turns are a challenge for beginners because you must turn 360 degrees with your partner every six steps while traveling briskly down the dance floor.  The secret to making progressive waltz turns well is to dance straight through your partner and do not try to dance around your partner.  The look of the waltz turns can be dramatically improved if both partners add a "lock step" as follows.  On left waltz turns, the man will add a lock step on count 3 and the lady should lock on count 6.  To simplify this, add the lock step anytime you are traveling forward into a waltz turn.  Remember that you lock at opposite times from your partner.  When the man locks, the lady doesn't, when the lady locks, the man doesn't.  Neither partner should lock during right waltz turns.

The two styles of formal waltz are American and International.  In American-style waltz, dancers can include a multitude of patterns that allow space and separation between the dancers.  In international-style waltz, dance partners are required to maintain body contact throughout the dance.  Waltz dancers look especially attractive when the lean their upper body back and strengthen the dance frame between the lead and the follow.  This is especially crucial in international-style waltz to keep the frame strong between dancers who are so close together.

The speed of waltz can vary dramatically.  Slow Modern Waltz ranges from 85 to 110 bpm (beats per minute).  Medium speed waltzes range from 110 to 140 bpm.  Lastly, fast (Viennese) waltzes range from 140 to 180 bpm.  Many beginning dancers are afraid to try Viennese waltz because it seems too fast.  The secret to dancing Viennese Waltz well is taking very small quick steps on some patterns and using hold-tap footwork on other patterns. In hold-tap footwork, you will take a step and hold on 1, 2, 3 with all weight, and while you are holding use your other foot to do a tap with no weight on count 2 hold 3.

Good waltz dancers will travel gracefully and continuously around the room following the line-of-dance.  If another couple gets in their way, a good waltz couple will immediately and smoothly switch to patterns that stay in one place until traffic clears, whereupon they can resume traveling down the dance floor.

Lastly, waltz should be very smooth and the feet should hardly make a sound as they touch the floor.  To improve your style, rather than dancing "on the floor", think about literally trying to dance "above the floor" as you dance the waltz.

Viennese Waltz Dance Facts

Viennese Waltz: Dance Facts      |  Music |  Patterns |  Videos |  Main Menu
Viennese Waltz Music The music for waltz uses the 3/4 time signature with three beats per measure and an accent on count 1.
Viennese Waltz History Since the waltz first originated in Vienna, Austria in ≈1800 it has remained popular for 200 years and is still popular today. The word "Waltz" comes from the old German world "waltzen" which means to roll, turn, or glide. In the early 1800's, the waltz caused a scandal (and was called an immoral dance) because of its romantic elements and close positions. Also, in the early 1800's, the man's outstretched hand was on top of the lady's outstretched hand in a protective position as it was considered much too intimate to hold the outstretched hands palm-to-palm. Even the fact that dancers stood very closely together in a face-to-face position was considered scandalous by the churches of the early 1800's. One commentator, in describing the dance could not even say the waltz was danced face-to-face and described that the waltz as being danced "the opposite of back to back".
Viennese Waltz Rhythm 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 (all steps are quick's)
Mans steps with left foot on count 1.
Mans steps with right foot on count 4.
Viennese Waltz Technique Waltz looks especially pretty if you take a larger step on count 1 and on count 4. When you can do the steps correctly and with good balance, then start taking larger steps throughout the waltz.
Viennese Waltz Style "Dance Above the Floor." The waltz is a smooth dance. Graceful, fluid movement. Legs, feet, and body should move smoothly throughout the dance. You should glide smoothly across the floor. You should move across the floor with ease. Don't push downward into the floor (notice the differences from the Latin dancer that places each foot carefully on clay floors). The waltz is traditionally danced in big ballroom floors (with sure footing) in Europe.
Progressive Dance The waltz can be done in one location, or it can progress around the room along the line of dance. In traditional ballroom dancing and in country dancing, the waltz is almost always a progressive dance. As you are moving around the room, if someone gets in your way, then you should switch to your stationary patterns until traffic clears and you can again start traveling. (Note: Other progressive dances include the foxtrot, country two-step, and polka). If the dance floor is too crowded to progress down the floor, then use stationary waltz dance patterns and treat the waltz as a spot dance.
Forms of the Waltz The two primary forms of waltz are the "Modern Waltz" which is slow, and the "Viennese Waltz" which is fast. The Viennese Waltz is twice as fast as the Modern Waltz.

In America, the Country Waltz is an important dance. The Country waltz include a basic that progresses forward on every step, whereas the ballroom progressive forward waltz includes a side step.

American Style Waltz is similar to the International Style except that it has both open and closed positions. This provides the American Style dancer with more opportunities for variety and self-expression.

International Style Waltz is danced in close position. International Style dancers are required to maintain contact at the mid-section of the body with no "gapping".

Waltz Technique Dance Position: Although close dance position is technically correct for traditional ballroom dance, most people use a closed position for the waltz.

Use standard ballroom hold. Keep your shoulders level. Ladies left elbow is outside of and on top of the man's right elbow.

Use Close Position for Progressive Waltz Turns in the Line of Dance: The guy will need to pull the lady into close position when doing progressive turns in the line of dance. Whenever you are making sharp turns with a high degree of rotation with your partner, you must be close together or you will not be able to complete the turn successfully.

Guys, since there are several patterns that start on count 1 and there are several patterns that start on count 4, you should count the waltz as "1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6". The guy will step with his left foot on count 1 and with his right foot on count 4. Remember that most patterns start on count 1. However right turns and 6-count walk-arounds start on count 4.

Foot placement: Keep the weight forward on your feet and when do come down on your heels, do so softly. Heel-ball-toe going forward and Toe-ball-heel going backwards.

Rise and fall (on the ball of your feet on counts 2 and 5). Rise and fall should be smooth like a horse on a carousel. Both the man and the woman should use rise and fall throughout the entire dance in all of the patterns.

Viennese Waltz Patterns

Viennese Waltz: Patterns      |  Music |  Technique |  Facts |  Videos |  Main Menu
Waltz Left Box
  • Basic step: straight, stop, and push to the side, men swing thru, lady swing thru
  • Box straight
  • Box turning left (go straight forward and then turn your shoulders) (go straight back and then turn your shoulders) Gentlemen, pull your left shoulder back throughout the box turning left. Turn 90º at each corner. On each corner of a turning box, the person going forward takes big steps and the person going backward takes little steps. "Men swing through, lady swing through…"
Waltz Right Box
  • 2-way turns: left turns → ½ basic → right turns → ½ basic → twinkle → repeat. (Note: You must do a ½ box before doing a right turn. The left turn starts on count 1, and the right turn starts on count 4)
Waltz Turns Line of Dance
  • men swing thru, lady swing thru (chassé turns).
  • Try to stay on a straight line as you do waltz turns line-of-dance. The lead should travel straight through the lady (like walking through a door) on counts 1, 2, 3, and the lady should travel straight through the man on counts 4, 5 6.
  • Guys, remember that you will need to be close to your partner when doing a sharp turn with your partner in closed position. Guys, remember to pull her into "close" position.
  • Waltz turns line-of-dance must turn 180º on the first 3 counts, or you will have to turn even more than halfway on the next 3 counts.
  • Person going forward takes big steps.
  • Person going backward takes little steps.
Progressive Basic
  • walk, stop, push-to-the-side, walk, stop, push-to-the-side
5th Position Breaks
  • Side-to-side waltz:
    Side breaks in closed position: Step to the side on count 1, then rock replace on counts 2 and 3.
Twinkle
  • closed twinkle: forward side together, cross through, side together. Turn your hips a little in the direction of the promenade. (also called the "waltz promenade")
  • continuity twinkle (turn shoulders right on count 2) The man turns the lady by turning his body. 1, 2, travel, cross, side, together.
  • promenade with ladies underarm turn: ½ basic → right-turn to face wall → ladies underarm turn (lady does forward, back, forward, cross, side, together)
  • back twinkle: ½ basic → 1 measured right turn → backup turning → cross, side, together.
Progressive Twinkle or Triple Twinkle
  • Triple twinkle → catch waist on count 4 → promenade 6 counts → resume triple twinkle.
  • Zig Zag Twinkle: The lady does the same footwork as the triple twinkle. The man travels forward and then backward.
  • triple twinkle: continuity twinkle → 1, 2, go-forward → 2, 2, go-forward → 3, 2, go-forward → cross, side, together.
  • Progress Flip-Flops (or "Triple twinkle") in open position (rather than holding catching her shoulder, just catch her hand.) (can promenade during this move also)
  • Progressive Flip-Flops Switching Sides
6-Count Under Arm Turn or Slow Under Arm Turn
  • ladies 6-count walk around (start after ½ basic) This pattern looks good if the lady makes a wide circle.
  • ladies 6-count walk around with simultaneous gentlemen's turn (the man should turn-left-in-place on the last 3 counts).
Hesitations or Balance Steps
  • forward balance (second foot is always heel to endstep) Optional: You can push up on your toe to achieve rise and fall. (Lift up on lady's shoulder to keep her from travelling.)
  • forward balance → back a ¼ turn
  • forward balance → back a ½ turn (On this step, the guy should only turn when going backwards)
  • side balance
  • side balance with lady pivot turn
  • forward balance → open balance → back balance
  • lady's inside / outside turn: men forward, right balance → right side balance → sailor shuffle → right side balance. Women back, turn 2,3 → side balance 4,5,6 → pivot turn → side balance.
Promenade Hesitations
  • Zig Zag hesitations
  • the stroll – end with a closed twinkle.
  • promenade → crossovers → spot turn → interlocking arms → basic waltz
Serpentine
  • Right outside partner then left outside partner.
  • Waltz in promenade position. Outside forward 1, inside rock forward 2, rock back 3, inside back 4, outside rock back 5, rock forward 6.
  • Nightclub 2-Step Patterns to Waltz Time:
    • Left turns
    • Left turns with underarm turn
    • Right turns
    • Right turns with underarm turn
  • You can transition from the box to the forward and back breaks as follows: Do a ½ box, then the guy will step to the right on the next slow, then start the forward and back breaks.
  • To go back into the box, use a (right side) side break (or a right-side parallel break) to the man's right side. A side break is the same as a back break except that you are in closed position.
  • To go back into the forward and back breaks: After lady has done a spot turn to the man's left (This can be after either an underarm turn or a turn-around.)
  • To transition from the box to forward crossovers: After a ½ box, the man steps directly to his right on the next slow.
  • To transition from forward and back breaks to forward crossovers: After a full basic, the guy should pull away from the lady on the last slow and lead her into forward crossovers.

Waist-hold Patterns in Waltz:
  • International Rumba
  • Side-to-side waltz in open position
  • Side-to-side waltz in closed position
  • Parallel breaks
  • Waltz turns line-of-dance

Latin Patterns to Waltz Time:
  • Side-to-side waltz
  • Open side breaks
  • Forward crossovers
  • Lady's spot turn
  • Arch turn with joined hands
  • back breaks with side-by-side charge
  • international rumba to waltz time
  • Waltz turn-around pattern (Similar to Rumba turn-around pattern)
  • Continuity (running steps)

parallel breaks
  • Teach entering parallel breaks:
  • from waltz box
  • From International rumba
  • (Outside partner position)
  • parallel breaks (after right side parallel break go forward into the waltz box)

Spot turn patterns:
  • Figure-8 underarm turns (in figure-8: guy with body turned to the right, step forward then back.)
  • arch turns (underarm turns)
  • double arch turns (on both sides): The lady can put her free hand on her waist.
  • Outside hand turns
  • Arch turns with joined hands: Both man and lady do an outside turn simultaneously with outside hands held throughout the turn.
  • Double-arch turns with joined hands
  • add forward and back underarm turn

open break patterns:
  • You can transition into an open break any time that the lady is stepping back with her right foot; the guy can then step back with his left foot to make the open break.

peek-a-boo patterns (from open break):
  • (start with an open break lead)
  • peek-a-boo high hand
  • peek-a-boo straight arm
  • peek-a-boo cuddle: two hand peek-a-boo into cuddle → promenade in cuddle → unwrap to 2-hand open position.
  • peek-a-boo sweetheart (from shake-hands position)
  • peek-a-boo skater
  • yo-yo (tuck-turn and re-wrap):
    two-hand peek-a-boo into cuddle position → tuck turn out → rewrap to cuddle (Ladies, always re-wrap with the wrapping hand on-top)
  • sweetheart yo-yo

Shadow patterns and fake steps (from open break):
  • (Shadow patterns are same foot patterns.)
  • sweetheart shadow: open break in handshake position → pull her into sweetheart while doing the fake → go side-to-side in double sweetheart shadow matching her footwork → fake back to the basic and switch the hands
  • cuddle shadow (or "cuddle guided turn")
  • skater shadow

Passing patterns (from open break):
  • passing hand change: switch to handshake position → open break → the man pulls her to his side while he passes behind her and goes to the opposite side (as the man passes her he lets his opposite hand slide down her opposite shoulder to switch the hands) → repeat the passing hand change 3 times
  • Don Sohn
  • Underarm pass
  • passing underarm turn
  • cross-hold two-hand passing turns
    • (From shake-hands position, start this pattern by first bringing one hand over her head, then ask for the other hand.)
    • with man doing forward crossovers
    • with man doing back breaks

Charge patterns(Can add rotation: forward turning left, backward turning left):
  • same foot
  • side-by-side charge
  • cuddle charge
  • sweetheart charge
  • open skater charge
  • closed skater charge
  • opposite foot
  • open promenade charge
  • closed promenade charge
    Each partner is at a 45º angle and partners are slightly apart. The man's right hand can hold the lady's side to keep her from turning.

Same-hand crossover (full moon):
  • Start with a cross-body lead and switch to same hands and roll into a forward crossover. The man hold the lady's right hand with his right hand throughout the remainder of this pattern. The man then turns 180º and leads the lady into a cross-body lead followed by a forward crossover. This pattern is repeated several times. During each crossbody lead, the lady raises her left hand in a large circular gentle arc that ends with her left hand on her right shoulder. During each forward crossover, the lady extends her left hand straight out to her left side. At the end of the pattern, the lady does an inside double-turn to the right followed immediately by the basic.

Curtsy and Bow (Starter Step)
  • Both partners start facing the same direction with the lady on the man's right. Both partners start on their left foot. The man does back balance4,5,6 bow1,2,3 forward balance4,5,6 with no weight on 2nd foot.  Lady turns 180° in 3 steps4,5,6, curtsy1,2,3, forward balance4,5,6.
  • Lady's curtsy: Lady steps to the right, then steps behind with her left foot, then bends both knees with all of her weight on the back knee, and then straightens and closes toward the front foot. (She should bow her head slightly at an angle and her front foot should be pointed and should touch the floor with the toe. She should have her arms in front of her and can hold her dress in two points when she bends.)
  • Gentleman's bow: The gentlemen steps to the side with his left foot, then closes with his right foot to the instep of the left, and then bows (while looking at the lady) from his navel upward, and then straightens.



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